Research

Last updated November 2022

1789 Statistical Census of Mennonites in West Prussia

1789 Statistical Census of Mennonites in West Prussia

Extracted by Rod Ratzlaff, Modified by Glenn H Penner

This census is only a village by village count of fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, male servants and female servants in the Mennonite households of West Prussia. It contains no names. The extraction has been condensed down to a spreadsheet, for statistical purposes.

1842 Description of the Mennonite Colonies in Russia

1842 Description of the Mennonite Colonies in Russia

JOURNAL OF THE MINISTRY OF CROWN PROPERTIES*
Volume 2, Part 1, 1842

This is an electronic version typed off the original typewritten translation by John P. Dyck of Springstein, Manitoba from the Russian journal “The Journal of the Ministry of State Dominion.” Dyck’s translation has not been checked against the original.

This version was typed by Selenna Wolfe with editing by Selenna Wolfe and Glenn Penner.

*Origin article is: “Opisanie Menonistskikh kolonii v Rossii” Zhurnal Ministerstva gosudarstvennykh imushchestv , 4 (1842), 1-42. Much of this article is also reproduced in a report from about 1858 as found in the St. Petersburg archives (RGIA) Fond 821 Opis 5 Delo 955.

Lists of Structures in the Molotschna and Chortitza Mennonite Settlements for 1831

1831 Lists of Structures in the Molotschna and Chortitza Mennonite Settlements

State Archives of Dnipro Regin (DADO) Fond 134, Opis 1, Delo 912
Prepared by Glenn H Penner

This document provides information on various structures which existed within the Molotschna and Chortitza colonies or owned by the colonies or their inhabitants. This is not a translation of the document. The German in these documents is typical of the bureaucratic German used by the colony administration and the Guardianship Committee for Foreign Settlers, for whom these documents were prepared – lengthy and convoluted sentences. I have replaced all umlauts, etc. of the original German, but retained the original spellings of names and locations. This is also not a list of businesses run by Mennonites, as many of those were part of the person’s home and not found in separate structures.

Traditional Mennonite Village Names

Village Names Analysis

Those who are familiar with the history of Low-German Mennonites are well aware of the transplantation of village names from West Prussia to South Russia, and from there to other parts of Russia, North America and South America. As fewer Mennonite genealogists have a good knowledge of German, it becomes more important that the origins and meanings of these village names be explained. With this in mind, I have prepared a guide to the meanings of some of the numerous prefixes, roots and suffixes used to generate these village names. In addition, I provide information on the history of some of the original villages of a given name.